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Posts Tagged ‘Mysterious’

GOD’S Embroidery

Posted by kathavarta on November 14, 2008

When I was a little boy, my mother used to embroider a great deal. I would sit at her knee and look up from the floor and ask what she was doing. She informed me that she was embroidering. As from the underside I watched her work within the boundaries of the little round hoop that she held in her hand. I complained to her that it sure looked messy from where I sat.

She would smile at me, look down and gently say, “My son, you go about your playing for a while, and when I am finished with my embroidering, I will put you on my knee and let you see it from my side.”

I would wonder why she was using some dark threads along with the bright ones and why they seemed so jumbled from my view. A few minutes would pass and then I would hear Mother’s voice say, “Son, come and sit on my knee.”

This I did only to be surprised and thrilled to see a beautiful flower or a sunset. I could not believe it, because from underneath it looked so messy.

Then Mother would say to me, “My son, from underneath it did look messy and jumbled, but you did not realize that there was a pre- drawn plan on the top. It was a design. I was only following it. Now look at it from my side and you will see what I was doing.”

Many times through the years I have looked up to my Heavenly Father and said, “Father, what are You doing?”

He has answered, “I am embroidering your life.”

I say, “But it looks like a mess to me. It seems so jumbled. The threads seem so dark. Why can’t they all be bright?”

The Father seems to tell me, “My child, you go about your business of doing My business, and one day I will bring you to Heaven and put you on My knee and you will see the plan from My side.”

Posted by Vikas Goyal for topmoralstories.blogspot.com
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Posted in Moral story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Medical Problem

Posted by kathavarta on October 12, 2008

An old woman came into her doctor’s office and confessed to an embarrassing problem. “I do that all the time, Doctor Johnson, but they’re soundless, and they have no odor. In fact, since I’ve been here, I did it no less than twenty times. What can I do?”

“Here’s a prescription, Mrs. Harris. Take these pills three times a day for seven days and come back and see me in a week.”

Next week an upset Mrs. Harris marched into Dr. Johnson’s office. “Doctor, I don’t know what was in those pills, but the problem is worse! I’m doing it just as much, but now it smells terrible! What do you have to say for yourself?”

“Calm down, Mrs. Harris,” said the doctor soothingly. “Now that we’ve fixed your sinuses, we’ll work on your hearing!!!”

From: http://www.onlyfunnystories.com
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Posted in Funny Story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Best known Man in the World

Posted by kathavarta on October 10, 2008

Well Sulio’s boss thinks for a minute and then comes up with a name. “Tom Selleck! I bet you don’t know Tom Selleck!” Sulio says “Tom Selleck! Tom and I were in boy scouts together when we were kids!” but Sulio’s boss says “No you weren’t!” then Sulio says “Yes we were!” so they fly to Hollywood and drive up to Tom Selleck’s house. Sulio knocks on the door and Tom Selleck answers and Sulio goes “Tom!!!” and Tom goes “Sulio!” and they hug and catch up for 30 minutes and Sulio’s boss can’t believe it. But then he thinks “Well that could happen, it’s just one person,” so he tells Sulio and Sulio says “OK, pick somebody else!”

This time Sulio’s boss has someone in mind! “The president, Bill Clinton! You don’t know Bill Clinton!” but Sulio says “Oh yes I do! Bill and I were on debate team together in college!” Sulio’s boss says “No you weren’t!” and Sulio says “Yes we were!” so they fly to Washington and they catch up with the President at a press conference. They work their way through the crowd until Sulio get’s close enough to catch Clinton’s eye and waves “Bill!” and the President waves “Sulio!” and after the press conference they hug and catch up for 30 minutes and Sulio’s boss is stunned– he can’t believe it. But then he thinks “Well that’s just two people in one country– that doesn’t mean he knows everyone in the whole world!” so he tells Sulio and Sulio says “OK, pick someone out of the world spectrum and I know them!”

And Sulio’s boss knows just who to pick so he says “The Pope! You do not know the Pope!” and Sulio says “The Pope! The Pope BAPTIZED me!” and Sulio’s boss says “No he didn’t!” and Sulio says “Yes he did!” so they fly to Rome where the Pope is giving Mass in front of hundreds of thousands of people. They work their way through the crowd– without much luck– so Sulio says “Boss, we’re never gonna get there together through all these people so I tell you what–I’ll work my way up there and when I do, I’ll give you a sign that shows you I know the Pope!” and he leaves. Well Sulio’s boss waits and waits and waits and just when he’s about to give up, he sees the Pope come out onto the balcony and right there beside him is Sulio!

Shortly afterwards, Sulio’s boss passes out. Sulio comes back and finds his boss passed out and he fans him and says “Boss! Boss! Wake up!” and when his boss comes to, he asks “Boss what happened?” Sulio’s boss looks at Sulio and says “OK, I can see Tom Selleck. I can see Bill Clinton…hell, I can even take the Pope! But when somebody standing next to me asks ‘Who’s that up there with Sulio?’ that’s a little more than I can take!

From: http://www.onlyfunnystories.com
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Posted in Funny Story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The death coach

Posted by kathavarta on September 25, 2008

It is midnight. The streets of Cohoes grow silent as the citizens turn off their lights one by one and go to their well-earned rest. The night is dark, and the wind whispers softly, touching the trees and houses, rattling a window pane here and there.

In one house, a woman sits beside her window, waiting silently for the doctor to arrive. Her beloved husband lies on the bed next to her. In the light of a single candle, she can see his emaciated face. He is in terrible pain, which even the drugs prescribed by the doctor cannot abate. She clutches his hand tightly, feeling the cold creeping through it. He is barely breathing now. She knows he is slipping away. One part of her is thankful, for she cannot bear to see him in so much pain. Most of her wants to scream out in desperation, begging him not to leave her alone.

Outside the house, the soft rumble of wheels and the clip-clop of hooves echo through the still night. The woman tears her eyes from her husband’s face and looks out of the window, expecting to see the doctor’s curricle pulling into the street. Instead, she sees a dark, closed coach with black gaping holes where the windows should be. The shafts at the front of the coach are empty, yet she can hear the sound of invisible horses’ hooves, as the coach moves slowly down the street.

She draws in a deep breath and exhales slowly. It is the Death Coach. Her husband had told her it would come for him that night, but she hadn’t believed him. Hadn’t wanted to believe him. Yet there it is, rolling slowly up to the front of the house to stop by the front gate. The sight terrifies her, and she clutches her husband’s hand tightly. He opens his eyes and smiles feebly at her, trying to squeeze her hand.

“Is it here?” he asks, his voice barely a whisper. She nods.

“I love you,” he says to his wife. She leans down and kisses him, feels his last breath on her lips. The grip on her hand loosens, and she knows he is dead. She straightens up, looking tenderly at his dead face through her tears.

A movement by the door causes her to look up. She sees her husband’s spirit standing at the door. He gazes first at his dead body, and then smiles at her. Then he turns and walks down the stairs. She moves at once to the window, flinging it open and leaning out, hoping to see him again. The front door opens, and her husband steps out the front porch and walks slowly to the Death Coach. The door opens, and he pauses for a moment to look towards the window, knowing she is watching. He waves and she waves back, tears streaming down her face. Then her husband steps into the coach and the door closes behind him. Slowly, the Death Coach rumbles down the street, turns a corner, and is gone.

“Goodbye, my love,” she calls softly, as the Death Coach disappears. Her husband’s pain is over, but her’s has just begun. With a heavy heart, she closes the window, and goes down the stairs to telephone the doctor and tell him her husband is dead.

By: Arti Agarwal on http://www.whereincity.com/stories
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Posted in Moral story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Grave

Posted by kathavarta on September 25, 2008

A young woman lay suffering on her deathbed, her stillborn baby lying against her chest. Her young husband crouched close, stricken with grief. His beautiful wife crooned a lullaby to her dead baby, her voice growing fainter as death drew near. Finally, she looked at her husband and asked him to bury her back East, beside her dead mother. Choked with grief, the young husband agreed.

But after his wife lay still in death, her husband could not bear to be parted from her and their dead child. He had them buried together beneath a lonely pine tree on a gently sloping knoll near their home, where he could visit the grave. As spring drew near, fragrant wildflowers bloomed across the knoll and the small grave.

One night, the husband threw himself across the flower-strewn grave, head buried in his arms as he tried to control his grief. As he lay there, the stillness of the night seemed to deepen. A light breeze tousled his hair and swayed the branches of the pine tree. At that moment, he heard a soft voice crooning a lullaby. He started upright, searching about for his wife. He heard a gurgle from an infant, a happy sound of contentment. Then the breeze died away, and the branches of the pine tree stilled. Then a shining light seemed to descend from the dark sky and hover over the young husband and the small grave under the tree. The husband heard the singing again, and the happy laugh of a small child. And then there was darkness. The husband went home that night with peace in his heart for the first time since the death of his wife.

By: Arti Agarwal on http://www.whereincity.com/stories
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Once a man and woman

Posted by kathavarta on August 16, 2008

There was once a man and woman who had been married for more than 60 years. They had shared everything. They had talked about everything. They had kept no secrets from each other.

Except that the little old woman had a shoe box in the top of her closet that she had cautioned her husband never to open or ask her about.

For all of these years, he had never thought about the box, but one day the little old woman got very sick and the doctor said she would not recover.

In trying to sort out their affairs, the little old man took down the shoe box and took it to his wife’s bedside. She agreed that it was time that he should know what was in the box.

When he opened it, he found two crocheted doilies and a stack of money totaling $25,000.

He asked her about the contents.

“When we were to be married,” she said, “My grandmother told me the secret of a happy marriage was to never argue. She told me that if I ever got angry with you, I should just keep quiet and crochet a doily.”

The little old man was so moved, he had to fight back tears. Only two precious doilies were in the box. She had only been angry with him two times in all those years of living and loving. He almost burst with happiness.

“Honey,” he said, “that explains the doilies, but what about all of this money? Where did it come from?”

“Oh,” she said, “that’s the money I made from selling the doilies.”
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