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Posts Tagged ‘Greed’

Da-da-da

Posted by kathavarta on December 15, 2008

From The Brhadaranyaka Upanisad V,ii,1
Translated by Swami Madhavananda, Advaita Ashram

Abdridged Note:
Dama-Dana-Daya. The first two letters of each of these three words are the same ‘Da’.

Dama means Self Control.
Dana means Give (Charity).
Daya means Compassion.

Three classes of Prajapati’s sons lived a life of continence as students with their father Prajapati (the Creator)- the gods, men and demons. (Devas, Manushyas and Asuras).

The gods on the completion of their term, said, “Please instruct us.”

Prajapati told them the syllable ‘Da’ and asked, “Have you understood?”

The gods said: “Yes we have understood. You tell us to CONTROL OURSELVES.”

Prajapati said: “Yes, you have understood”.

Then the men said to Prajapati: “Please instruct us.”

Prajapati told them the same syllable ‘Da’ and asked, “Have you understood?”

The men said: “Yes we have understood. You tell us to GIVE.”

Prajapati said: “Yes, you have understood.”

Then the demons (Asuras) said to Prajapati: “Please instruct us.”

Prajapati told them the same syllable ‘Da’ and asked “Have you understood?”

The demons (Asuras) said: “yes we have understood. You tell us to HAVE COMPASSION.”

Prajapati said: ” Yes, you have understood.”

That very thing is repeated by the heavenly voice, the cloud (through thunders) as ‘Da’, ‘Da’, ‘Da’ : Control yourselves, Give and Have Compassion. Therefore one should learn these three – Self Control, Charity and Compassion.

[Note: Swami Tatwananda, Sri Ramakrishna Advaita Ashrama, Kerala further explain this story]

The gods are the inhabitants of happy regions in the heavens. They gain those regions as their rewards for leading meritorious and virtuous lives. For them the pursuit of pleasure becomes the business of life. Unless they avail themselves of the superior opportunity available there to attain the knowledge of Brahman (Supreme Self), they would have dissipated all their acquired merits and virtues in the indulgence of the senses, and they would have to start again at the human level.

For the gods, pleasures of the flesh (senses) was the temptation and the control of the senses was their ally.

Men are generally avaricious, selfish. Therefore Prajapati told them to have charitable heart. Give of their ability, time, wealth, service etc.

Demons (Asuras) are generally cruel and given to injuring others. They lack compassion and therefore the demons should learn about compassion and practice compassion (Daya).

Source: http://hinduism.co.za
Visit www.eTirth.com for more religious information.
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Posted in Hindu story, Katha, Religious, Story for Adult | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fowler and the Viper

Posted by kathavarta on December 4, 2008

A Fowler, taking his bird-lime and his twigs, went out to catch birds.

Seeing a thrush sitting upon a tree, he wished to take it, and fitting his twigs to a proper length, watched intently, having his whole thoughts directed towards the sky.

While thus looking upwards, he unknowingly trod upon a Viper asleep just before his feet. The Viper, turning about, stung him, and falling into a swoon, the man said to himself, “Woe is me! that while I purposed to hunt another, I am myself fallen unawares into the snares of death.”
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Flies and the Honey-Pot

Posted by kathavarta on November 30, 2008

A Number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey which had been overturned in a housekeeper’s room, and placing their feet in it, ate greedily.

Their feet, however, became so smeared with the honey that they could not use their wings, nor release themselves, and were suffocated.

Just as they were expiring, they exclaimed, “O foolish creatures that we are, for the sake of a little pleasure we have destroyed ourselves.”

Moral:
Pleasure bought with pains, hurts.
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fisherman Piping

Posted by kathavarta on November 20, 2008

A Fisherman skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore.

Standing on a projecting rock, he played several tunes in the hope that the fish, attracted by his melody, would of their own accord dance into his net, which he had placed below.

At last, having long waited in vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting his net into the sea, made an excellent haul of fish.

When he saw them leaping about in the net upon the rock he said: “O you most perverse creatures, when I piped you would not dance, but now that I have ceased you do so merrily.”

Moral:
To do the right thing at the right season is a great art.
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fisher and the Little Fish

Posted by kathavarta on November 19, 2008

It happened that a Fisher, after fishing all day, caught only a little fish.

“Pray, let me go, master,” said the Fish. “I am much too small for your eating just now. If you put me back into the river I shall soon grow, then you can make a fine meal off me.”

“Nay, nay, my little Fish,” said the Fisher, “I have you now. I may not catch you hereafter.”

Moral:
A little thing in hand is worth more than a great thing in prospect.
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Beggar’s Rags

Posted by kathavarta on September 14, 2008

A beggar lived near the king’s palace. One day he saw a proclamation posted outside the palace gate. The king was giving a great dinner. Anyone dressed in royal garments was invited to the party.

The beggar went on his way. He looked at the rags he was wearing and sighed. Surely only kings and their families wore royal robes, he thought. Slowly an idea crept into his mind. The audacity of it made him tremble. Would he dare?

He made his way back to the palace. He approached the guard at the gate. “Please, sire, I would like to speak to the king.”

“Wait here,” the guard replied. In a few minutes, he was back. “His majesty will see you,” he said, and led the beggar in.

“You wish to see me?” asked the king.

“Yes, your majesty. I want so much to attend the banquet, but I have no royal robes to wear. Please, sir, if I may be so bold, may I have one of your old garments so that I, too, may come to the banquet?”

The beggar shook so hard that he could not see the faint smile that was on the king’s face. “You have been wise in coming to me,” the king said. He called to his son, the young prince. “Take this man to your room and array him in some of your clothes.”

The prince did as he was told and soon the beggar was standing before a mirror, clothed in garments that he had never dared hope for.

“You are now eligible to attend the king’s banquet tomorrow night,” said the prince. “But even more important, you will never need any other clothes. These garments will last forever.”

The beggar dropped to his knees. “Oh, thank you,” he cried. But as he started to leave, he looked back at his pile of dirty rags on the floor. He hesitated. What if the prince was wrong? What if he would need his old clothes again. Quickly he gathered them up.

The banquet was far greater than he had ever imagined, but he could not enjoy himself as he should. He had made a small bundle of his old rags and it kept falling off his lap. The food was passed quickly and the beggar missed some of the greatest delicacies.

Time proved that the prince was right. The clothes lasted forever. Still the poor beggar grew fonder and fonder of his old rags. As time passed people seemed to forget the royal robes he was wearing. They saw only the little bundle of filthy rags that he clung to wherever he went. They even spoke of him as the old man with the rags.One day as he lay dying, the king visited him.

The beggar saw the sad look on the king’s face when he looked at the small bundle of rags by the bed.Suddenly the beggar remembered the prince’s words and he realized that his bundle of rags had cost him a lifetime of true royalty. He wept bitterly at his folly. And the king wept with him.

Moral:
When we put our faith in God, & ask His Bounties & forgiveness, we must belive in Him and not to worry of future. As He has given us Today when we asked from Him, He will definitely give us tomorrow too if asked again.
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Posted in Moral story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »