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Significance of 108

Posted by kathavarta on November 16, 2008

The Indian Subcontinent rosary or set of Mantra counting has 108 beads. 108 has been a sacred number in the Indian Subcontinent for a very long time. This number is explained in many different ways.

The ancient Indians were excellent mathematicians and 108 may be the product of a precise mathematical operation (e.g. 1 power 1 x 2 power 2 x 3 power 3 = 108) which was thought to have special numerological significance.

Powers of 1, 2, and 3 in math:
1 to 1st power=1; 2 to 2nd power=4 (2×2); 3 to 3rd power=27 (3x3x3). 1x4x27=108

Sanskrit alphabet:
There are 54 letters in the Sanskrit alphabet. Each has masculine and feminine, Shiva and Shakti. 54 times 2 is 108.

Shri Yantra:
On the Shri Yantra there are marmas where three lines intersect, and there are 54 such intersections. Each intersections has masculine and feminine, Shiva and Shakti qualities. 54 x 2 equals 108. Thus, there are 108 points that define the Shri Yantra as well as the human body.

9 times 12:
Both of these numbers have been said to have spiritual significance in many traditions. 9 times 12 is 108. Also, 1 plus 8 equals 9. That 9 times 12 equals 108.

Heart Chakra:
The chakras are the intersections of energy lines, and there are said to be a total of 108 energy lines converging to form the heart chakra. One of them, Sushumna leads to the Crown Chakra, and is said to be the path to Self-realization.

Marmas:
Marmas or marmasthanas are like energy intersections called chakras, except have fewer energy lines converging to form them. There are said to be 108 marmas in the subtle body.

Time:
Some say there are 108 feelings, with 36 related to the past, 36 related to the present, and 36 related to the future. 36 times 3 equals 108.

Astrology:
There are 12 constellations, and 9 arc segments called namshas or chandrakalas. 9 times 12 equals 108. Chandra is moon, and kalas are the divisions within a whole.

Planets and Houses:
In astrology, there are 12 houses and 9 planets. 12 times 9 equals 108.

Gopis of Krishna:
In the Krishna tradition, there were said to be 108 Gopis or maid servants of Krishna.

1, 0, and 8:
1 stands for God or higher Truth,
0 stands for emptiness or completeness in spiritual practice, and
8 stands for infinity or eternity.

Sun and Earth:
The diameter of the sun is 108 times the diameter of the Earth.

Numerical scale:
The 1 of 108, and the 8 of 108, when added together equals 9, which is the number of the numerical scale, i.e. 1, 2, 3 … 10, etc., where 0 is not a number.

Smaller divisions:
The number 108 is divided, such as in half, third, quarter, or twelfth, so that some malas have 54, 36, 27, or 9 beads.

Islam:
The number 108 is used in Islam to refer to God.

Jain:
In the Jain religion, 108 are the combined virtues of five categories of holy ones, including 12, 8, 36, 25, and 27 (12+8+36+25+27=108) virtues respectively.

Sikh:
The Sikh tradition has a mala of 108 knots tied in a string of wool, rather than beads.

Chinese:
The Chinese Buddhists and Taoists use a 108 bead mala, which is called su-chu, and has three dividing beads, so the mala is divided into three parts of 36 each.

Stages of the soul said:
Atman, the human soul or center goes through 108 stages on the journey.

Meru:
This is a larger bead, not part of the 108. It is not tied in the sequence of the other beads. It is the quiding bead, the one that marks the beginning and end of the mala.

Dance:
There are 108 forms of dance in the Indian traditions.

Pythagorean:
The nine is the limit of all numbers, all others existing and coming from the same. ie: 0 to 9 is all one needs to make up an infinite amount of numbers.

We have listed below 108 Upanishads as per the list contained in the Muktikopanishad . We have arranged them in four categories according to the particular Veda to which each of them belong:
Riga Veda(10): Aitareya , Atmabodha, Kaushitaki, Mudgala, Nirvana, Nadabindu, Akshamaya, Tripura, Bahvruka, Saubhagyalakshmi.

Yajur Veda(50): Katha, Taittiriya , Isavasya , Brihadaranyaka, Akshi, Ekakshara, Garbha, Prnagnihotra, Svetasvatara, Sariraka, Sukarahasya, Skanda, Sarvasara, Adhyatma, Niralamba, Paingala, Mantrika, Muktika, Subala, Avadhuta, Katharudra, Brahma, Jabala, Turiyatita, Paramahamsa, Bhikshuka, Yajnavalkya, Satyayani, Amrtanada, Amrtabindu, Kshurika, Tejobindu, Dhyanabindu, Brahmavidya, YogakundalinI, Yogatattva, Yogasikha, Varaha, Advayataraka, Trisikhibrahmana, mandalabrahmana, Hamsa, Kalisantaraaa, Narayana, Tarasara, Kalagnirudra, Dakshinamurti, Pancabrahma, Rudrahrdaya, SarasvatIrahasya.

Sama Veda(16): Kena, Chandogya, Mahat, Maitrayani, Vajrasuci, Savitri, Aruneya, Kundika, Maitreyi, Samnyasa, Jabaladarsana, Yogacudaman, Avyakta, Vasudevai, Jabali, Rudrakshajabala.

Atharva Veda(32): Prasna , Mandukya, Mundaka, Atma, Surya, Narada-Parivrajakas, Parabrahma, Paramahamsa-Parivrajakas, Pasupatha-Brahma, Mahavakya, Sandilya, Krishna, Garuda, Gopalatapani, Tripadavibhuti-mahnarayana, Dattatreya, Kaivalya, NrsimhatapanI, Ramatapani, Ramarahasya, HayagrIva, Atharvasikha, Atharvasira, Ganapati, Brhajjabala, Bhasmajabala, Sarabha, Annapurna, TripuratapanI, Devi, Bhavana, SIta.

If you want more information or more mantras relating to the deities or principles involved, email to Katha@ymail.com.

Source: http://mailerindia.com/.
Visit www.eTirth.com for more religious information.
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Mantras FAQ

Posted by kathavarta on November 16, 2008

Q: I want to work with more than one mantra at a time, because I want to work on several things at once. Is this a good thing to do?

A: For your first experiment with mantras, I recommend you work with only one mantra for a full forty-eight day discipline. After that, work with any combination that makes sense to you. Remember, mantras work with energy – both yours and what you bring in from the universe – so if you work on more than one thing, try to keep them at least in the same general area.

Here We have given some Powerfull mantras:
Aum Gum Ganapatayei Namaha
Aum Dum Durgayei Namaha
Aum Shri Dhanvantre Namaha

Q: I sometimes say mantras silently when I am around other people. Is this OK?

A: Ultimately, saying mantras silently is the most powerful way to say them. The silent repetition stimulates the corresponding petals of the chakras so that energy is brought into the subtle body.

Q: I have heard that one must receive a mantra from a guru for it to work. Is this true?

A: Those who have unwrapped the power of a mantra through many repetitions achieve something called “Mantra Siddhi.” This means that they have attained some measure of power and proficiency with the mantra. At this point, they may give a mantra to others “with power,” meaning that the recipient will achieve results faster than doing it without having received it “with power.” However, Sanskrit mantras are your spiritual birthright since they are directly linked to the chakras. They will work even if you read them from a book and begin practice.
The minimum number of repetitions to achieve Mantra Siddhi is generally recognized as 125,000.

Q: I want to do a mantra on behalf of another person. Is this OK?

A: Praying for another person is a good thing to do for anybody at any time. However, Sanskrit Mantra is not exactly prayer because it is pro active and specific, whereas prayer leaves the mechanism of an answer up to Divine authority. Therefore, I recommend that wherever possible you ask permission from a person to undertake mantra work on their behalf. If this is not possible, then start with a prayer that this energy be used for their highest good and begin. I also recommend that you begin with the declaration that while you are performing this mantra on someone’s behalf (state their name) that you are by no means taking their karma.

Parents have an automatic right as well as responsibility to perform mantra work on behalf of their children.

Q: When we repeat durga ashtottaram for example can we have the image of baalaa , or lalitaa or kaali in our mind or do we need to have only the form of durga in our mind.Can we recite durga satanaama as addressed to lalitaambika.

A: The shastras say that “Aaavahitha devathaa anyath devabhi na archayet”. i.e, we should not worship the gods with anyother mantras, other than the ones meant for the invoked god. However, this rule takes a backseat, when we say Lalitha sahsranamam, and worship any female god, or Vishnu saharanama for any form of vishnu.

Q: Can we have the image of lord shiva while repeating any devi Ashtottara and image of devi while repeating shiva Ashtottara , in our mind.

A: There is no harm to have the image of shiva or shakthi, while worshipping either of them or another. again the shaastraas say that “Aavayorantharam naasthi candracandrikayoriva…..” . There is no difference between them(devi(lalitaa,baalaa,miinaakshi, durga),lord shiva) like moon and moonlight.

Q: How efficient are mantras, and is it a problem if we recite them less than perfectly?

A: A learned Brahmin, from Guntur who was a Ghanaapaathigal, went to the acharya of sringeri and poured out his woes. He said that he married 3 times till then, but some how all his three wives died soon after marriage, and he being a grahastha into yagnas and yagas, could not be without a wife , as a wife had certain important functions in a yajna. He told the acharyal, that he recited the sapthashathi daily, in addition to his japas and pooja. The acharyal, an unparallel Srividyopasaka, went about and divined the problem. He asked the ghanaapaaThigal to repeat the kavacha of sapthashathi. The ghanaapaaThigal, told the same and acharyal, pointed out the reason for his wives death. GhanaapaaThi sundara shastri avadhanigal, was telling “baaryaam bhakshathu bhairavii”… instead of “rakshathu bhairavii”, which lead to the wives death. I hope this illustration gives us a picture of mantra shastra and its importance. Likewise when saptashatii is learnt from a sat guru and if recited properly it is equally capable of bestowing bhogaa and moksha.

Q: Is Shrividya of Vedic origin? Are there any references to the devis lalitaa , baalaa , tripura , sundari in the vedas. atleast in the atharvana veda? Are there vedic references to shrii vidyaa?

A: Regarding lalitha, bala, tripura etc…. The vedas including Rig and Yajur have so many references, you cannot even conceive. There are upanishads in the atharvana , like tripuropanishad, tripurataapinupanishad, etc…. The aruna prashna, speaks volumes of Lalitha. Vedic reference to Baala, is found in Rigveda, in the khila bhaaga of srisuktha,sudhaa suktha, etc tripura and sundari, in atharvana veda, yajur veda, etc.. Tripura appears some 70 times in the vedas.” Regarding the origin of shrii vidyaa, the rigvedic hymn, “Chatvaari vak parimita…..” etc, gives details of srividya mantra and its esoteric meaning. Reference to srividya and its mantra derivatives, have been made atleast in 20 places through out the vedas. Especially Yajur and Rig veda. Srividya, originates from three mantras of the vedas. 1. jatavedase rik. from durga suktha yajur veda 2. gayathri mantra, rig veda 3. mrityunjaya mantra, yajur veda These three together are known as shatakshara vidya or shatakshara gayathri, as they have a 100 letters in them. This is the basis of srividya. ” These are only some of the references quoted. There are many references.It is thus very clear that shrii vidya is totally vedic in origin .I also heard that the above three mantraas are said to represent the very essence of vedaas. so there should be no doubt about the vedic origins of shrii vidya however hard some western tantrics may try to argue. Moreover what is available to us of the Vedas now is only about 10% of what was available in the remote past! Some sections may still be ‘secret’ in some families. I remember seeing a book many years ago, of Shri Ganapati Muni’s ‘finding’ sections of Rig Veda while in deep meditation in Gokarna.

Q: I almost meet with the insistence that a guru must initiate us in order that we may perform some of the devi poojas. With most of the traditional gurus being people of a particular community who guard these upaasana know-hows with utmost secrecy, I am feeling discouraged as I get the feeling that low castes will never get initiated.OR is there a way out?

A: A good Guru should not divide Shishyas by caste or sex. No where in vedas it is taught that mantras are not to be used by low caste people. Hindu system has formulated caste by the practice of profession and not merely by birth. Every hindu has the right to learn the sastras and mantras. If the disciple is true and devoted the Almighty will send a Guru for him to learn the mantras and sastras. So, for a start,

let us be true,
let us be devoted,
let us have love for the universe,
let us respect the elders,
let us not speak ill of our neighbours.

Rest assured is that Jagadamba will jump to embrace you in a way that you can see for yourself, because She is “Avyaja karuna” – Honest compassion.

If you want more information or more mantras relating to the deities or principles involved, email to Katha@ymail.com.

Source: http://mailerindia.com/.
Visit www.mandirinfo.com for more religious information.
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Common but Very Useful Mantras

Posted by kathavarta on November 16, 2008

SOME COMMON, BUT VERY USEFUL MANTRAS FOR JAPA

Lord Ganapati:
Aum Shri Ganapataye Namah

Lord Shiva:
Aum Namah Shivaya (Panchakshara)

Maha-Mrityunjaya Mantra:
Aum tryambakam yajamahe
sugandhim pushtivardhanam
uurvarukamiva bandhanaan
mrityor mukshiya maamritaat.

Shri Devi:
Aum Shri Durgayai Namah

Shri Kalika:
Aum Shri Kalikayai Namah

Shri Lakshmi:
Aum Shri Maha-Lakshmyai Namah

Lord Hari:
Aum Namo Narayanaya (Ashtakshara)

Hari Aum

Hari Aum Tat Sat

Lord Krishna:
Aum Sri Krishnaya Namah

Aum Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya

Aum Shri Krishnaya Govindaya Gopijana Vallabhaya Namah

Maha-Mantra:

Hare Rama Hare Rama
Rama Rama Hare Hare
Hare Krishna Hare Krishna
Krishna Krishna Hare Hare

Shri Hanuman:
Aum Shri Hanumate Namah

Lord Rama:
Aum Shri Ram Jaya Ram Jaya Jaya Ram

Aum Shri Ramaya Namah

Shri Rama Rama Rameti,
Rame Rame Manorame
Sahasranama Tattulyam Rama Nama Varanane

Aum Shri Sita-Ramachandradhyam Namah

Shri Ram

Shri Saraswati:
Aum Shri Sarasvatayai Namah

Shri Gayatri:
Aum bhur-bhuvah-swah tat savitur varenyam
bhargo devasya dheemahi dhiyo yo nah Prachodayat.

Lord Subramanya, Kartikeya:
Aum Shri Saravanabhavaya Namah

Sharangati Mantra (for surrender):
Aum Shri Ramah Sharanam Mama
Aum Shri Krishnah Sharanam Mama
Aum Shri Sita-Ramah Sharanam Mama

Shri Sharada:
Aum Shri Bala-Parameshvaryai Namah

Shri Tripurasundari:
Aum Shri Tripura-Sundaryai Namah

Vedantic Formulae:
Aum Soham

Aum Tat Tvam Asi

Aum Aham Brahma Asmi

If you want more information or more mantras relating to the deities or principles involved, email to Katha@ymail.com.

Source: http://mailerindia.com/.
Visit www.eTirth.com for more religious information.
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How to do Mantra Japa?

Posted by kathavarta on November 16, 2008

There is a Sakti or power in every word. The Name of God, chanted correctly or incorrectly, knowingly or unknowingly, carefully, is sure to give the desired result.The glory of the Name of God cannot be established through reasoning and intellect. It can be experienced or realized only through devotion, faith and constant repetition of the Name. By Mantra japa, you can attain peace of mind quickly. By prolonged and constant practice the inherent power of the Mantra (Mantra-Sakti) will be awakened, which will fill your very existence with the Divinity of the Mantra.

PRACTICAL AIDS TO JAPA

1. Select any Mantra or Name of God, preferably that given to you by your Guru, and repeat it from 108 to 1,080 times daily (one to ten malas).

2. Always keep your Guru-Mantra a secret. Never disclose it to anyone. It is better to stick to one Mantra only. Take a bath or wash your hands, feet, face and mouth before sitting for Japa in the morning. At other times this is not absolutely necessary. Do Japa whenever you have leisure, at the three junctions of the day – morning, noon and evening – and before going to bed.

3. The early morning period (Brahmamuhurta) and dusk is the most favourable time for Japa and meditation. This is when Sattva (purity or steadiness) is predominant.

4. Face east or north during the practice. This enhances the efficacy of the Japa.

5. Sit on a deer skin or rug. Spread a piece of cloth over it. This conserves body-electricity. Sit in a separate meditation room or in any suitable place, such as a temple, on a river bank or under a banyan or peepul tree.

6. Maintain a steady pose. Attain mastery of the posture. You must be able to sit in Padmasana, Siddhasana or Sukhasana for three hours at a strech. Recite some prayers before starting the Japa. Reslove to complete a certain minimum number of malas before leaving your seat.

7. A rosary is a whip to goad the mind towards God. Use a rudraksha or tulsi mala of 108 beads. Do not allow the mala to hang below the navel. Keep the hand near the heart or the nose. The mala must not be visible to you or to others. Cover it with a towel or handkerchief, which must be clean and washed daily. Use the middle finger and the thumb of the right to roll the beads. The use of the index finger is prohibited.Do not cross the meru while rolling the beads. Turn back when you come to it.

8. Do mental Japa for sometimes without a mala. When the mind wanders, do the Japa aloud, or whisper the Mantra for some time and come back to mental Japa again as soon as possible.

9. When you repeat the Mantra, have the feeling or mental attitude that the Lord is seated in your heart, that purity or Sattva is flowing from the Lord into your mind, that the Mantra is purifying your heart, destroying desires, cravings and evil thoughts.

10. Do not do the Japa in a hurried manner. Do it slowly with feeling, one-pointedness of mind and single-minded devotion. Pronounce the Mantra distinctly and without any mistakes. Repeat it neither too slowly nor too fast. Increase the speed only when the mind wanders. Be vigilant and alert during Japa. Stand up when sleep tries to overpower you.

11. Try to associate the Japa with the rhythm of the breath and meditate in the form of your Deity. Keep a picture or idol of the Deity in front of you. Think of the meaning of the Mantra while repeating it. Regularity in Japa Sadhana is most essential if success is to be achieved. Sit in the same place and at the same time every day. Do not beg for any worldly objects from God while doing Japa. Feel that your heart is being purified and that the mind is becoming steady by the power of the Mantra and the Grace of the Lord.

12. Observe silence and avoid distractions, calls and engagements. It is important not to leave the place at once after the Japa is over and mix with everyone or plunge into worldly activity. Sit very quietly for at least ten minutes, humming some prayer, remembering the Lord and reflecting upon His infinite love. Then, after devout prostration, leave the place and commence your routine duties and activities. In this way the spiritual vibrations will remain intact. Continue the current of Japa mentally at all times, whatever be the activity in which you are engaged. Carry on your Sadhana with tenacity and perseverance, without a break. Realize the glorious goal of life and enjoy supreme bliss.

SOME COMMON, BUT VERY USEFUL MANTRAS FOR JAPA

Lord Ganapati:
Aum Shri Ganapataye Namah

Lord Shiva:
Aum Namah Shivaya (Panchakshara)

Maha-Mrityunjaya Mantra:
Aum tryambakam yajamahe
sugandhim pushtivardhanam
uurvarukamiva bandhanaan
mrityor mukshiya maamritaat.

Shri Devi:
Aum Shri Durgayai Namah

Shri Kalika:
Aum Shri Kalikayai Namah

Shri Lakshmi:
Aum Shri Maha-Lakshmyai Namah

Lord Hari:
Aum Namo Narayanaya (Ashtakshara)

Hari Aum

Hari Aum Tat Sat

Lord Krishna:
Aum Sri Krishnaya Namah

Aum Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya

Aum Shri Krishnaya Govindaya Gopijana Vallabhaya Namah

Maha-Mantra:

Hare Rama Hare Rama
Rama Rama Hare Hare
Hare Krishna Hare Krishna
Krishna Krishna Hare Hare

Shri Hanuman:
Aum Shri Hanumate Namah

Lord Rama:
Aum Shri Ram Jaya Ram Jaya Jaya Ram

Aum Shri Ramaya Namah

Shri Rama Rama Rameti,
Rame Rame Manorame
Sahasranama Tattulyam Rama Nama Varanane

Aum Shri Sita-Ramachandradhyam Namah

Shri Ram

Shri Saraswati:
Aum Shri Sarasvatayai Namah

Shri Gayatri:
Aum bhur-bhuvah-swah tat savitur varenyam
bhargo devasya dheemahi dhiyo yo nah Prachodayat.

Lord Subramanya, Kartikeya:
Aum Shri Saravanabhavaya Namah

Sharangati Mantra (for surrender):
Aum Shri Ramah Sharanam Mama
Aum Shri Krishnah Sharanam Mama
Aum Shri Sita-Ramah Sharanam Mama

Shri Sharada:
Aum Shri Bala-Parameshvaryai Namah

Shri Tripurasundari:
Aum Shri Tripura-Sundaryai Namah

Vedantic Formulae:
Aum Soham

Aum Tat Tvam Asi

Aum Aham Brahma Asmi

If you want more information or more mantras relating to the deities or principles involved, email to Katha@ymail.com.

Source: http://mailerindia.com/.
Visit www.etirth.com for more religious information.
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What is a Mantra and How does it work?

Posted by kathavarta on November 16, 2008

Mantras are powerful sounds. Mantras are the ones that have when chanted produce great effects. These are chanted repeatedly and that is called Japa. Japa is a key part of Hindu prayer.

Mantras are very rich in their meaning. While doing japa one can meditate on the mantra and its meaning. As the mind dwell more and more into that, the mantra conditions the mind and takes up to the higher states and forms the path to the great liberation – eternal bliss!

What makes mantras so special as compared to the normal words?
Mantras are not human composed. One may wonder how can that be possible. Especially given that there are sages associated with the mantras! The point to be noted is that these sages are not composers of these mantras, as we normaly compose the sentences; they are not the inventors, but they are the discoverers of the mantra. They get to know the mantras in a state in which these words do not emanate from their thoughts, but they are just passive audience to it. Those who go deep in meditation and realize God may be able to get a feel of this situation.

To be such a discoverer, even though they are just passive hearers, needs great amount of qualification. Only the perfect one can unchangedly reproduce the mantra heard. The only one that is absolutely perfect is God. All other discoverers reproduce that mantra only as pure as their closeness to perfection.

Veda Samhitas are full of mantras and hence have been preserved for ages in their pure form by utilizing the various techniques like Patha, Krama, Japa, Gana Patas, that ensure that the chanter clearly gets the correct letters and even the correct level of sound for each letter (Svara). The chanters are advised to chant the mantras only after getting the right pronunciation of it, so that the mantras are presered against deterioration with time. There would be gurus who initiate the disciple in a mantra. guru ensures that the disciple got the mantra right, so that the person can chant independently as well as initiate others in that mantra. Ensuring this preservation vedas were passed only through the tradition of guru and disciples and was never written down till very recent past. (It is really amazing to note that without being written down the vedas have been preserved in pure form across the land by these techniques. Though the texts are freely available now for anybody to read, it would be important to ensure that these mantras are properly learnt and then chanted. This way the treasure that as been preserved so carefully over multiple milleniums do not deteriorate due to indifference.)

It is to be noted that many of the hymns of Thirumu Rai are known to have great powers of mantras that are practiced even today.

While there are plenty of type of mantras available, there are a few that are chanted with high esteem by the shaivas. Definitely those are highly powerful ones that can lead the chanter on the great path to mukti (liberation).

Pranava, Panchakashra (e.g. Om Namah Shivaya), Ashtakshara (e.g. Om Namo Narayanaya) to name a few.

For Shaivites the Holy Five Syllables (Panchakashra) or for Vaishnavites the Holy Eight Syllables (Ashtakshara) with or without combined with the Pranava is the ultimate mantra.

Definition # 1: Mantras are energy-based sounds.

Saying any word produces an actual physical vibration. Over time, if we know what the effect of that vibration is, then the word may come to have meaning associated with the effect of saying that vibration or word. This is one level of energy basis for words.

Another level is intent. If the actual physical vibration is coupled with a mental intention, the vibration then contains an additional mental component which influences the result of saying it. The sound is the carrier wave and the intent is overlaid upon the wave form, just as a colored gel influences the appearance and effect of a white light.

In either instance, the word is based upon energy. Nowhere is this idea more true than for Sanskrit mantra. For although there is a general meaning which comes to be associated with mantras, the only lasting definition is the result or effect of saying the mantra.

Definition #2: Mantras create thought-energy waves.

The human consciousness is really a collection of states of consciousness which distributively exist throughout the physical and subtle bodies. Each organ has a primitive consciousness of its own. That primitive consciousness allows it to perform functions specific to it. Then come the various systems. The cardio-vascular system, the reproductive system and other systems have various organs or body parts working at slightly different stages of a single process. Like the organs, there is a primitive consciousness also associated with each system. And these are just within the physical body. Similar functions and states of consciousness exist within the subtle body as well. So individual organ consciousness is overlaid by system consciousness, overlaid again by subtle body counterparts and consciousness, and so ad infinitum.

The ego with its self-defined “I” ness assumes a pre-eminent state among the subtle din of random, semi-conscious thoughts which pulse through our organism. And of course, our organism can “pick up” the vibration of other organisms nearby. The result is that there are myriad vibrations riding in and through the subconscious mind at any given time.

Mantras start a powerful vibration which corresponds to both a specific spiritual energy frequency and a state of consciousness in seed form. Over time, the mantra process begins to override all of the other smaller vibrations, which eventually become absorbed by the mantra. After a length of time which varies from individual to individual, the great wave of the mantra stills all other vibrations. Ultimately, the mantra produces a state where the organism vibrates at the rate completely in tune with the energy and spiritual state represented by and contained within the mantra.

At this point, a change of state occurs in the organism. The organism becomes subtly different. Just as a laser is light which is coherent in a new way, the person who becomes one with the state produced by the mantra is also coherent in a way which did not exist prior to the conscious undertaking of repetition of the mantra.

Definition #3: Mantras are tools of power and tools for power.

They are formidable. They are ancient. They work. The word “mantra” is derived from two Sanskrit words.

The first is “Manas” or “Mind,” which provides the “Man” syllable.

The second syllable is drawn from the Sanskrit word “Trai” meaning to “Protect” or to “Free from.”

Therefore, the word mantra in its most literal sense means “To Free from the Mind.”

Mantra is, at its core, a tool used by the mind which eventually frees one from the vagaries of the mind.

But the journey from mantra to freedom is a wondrous one. The mind expands, deepens and widens and eventually dips into the essence of cosmic existence. On its journey, the mind comes to understand much about the essence of the vibration of things. And knowledge, as we all know, is power. In the case of mantra, this power is tangible and wieldable.

Statements About Mantra

Mantras have close, approximate one-to-one direct language-based translation.

If we warn a young child that it should not touch a hot stove, we try to explain that it will burn the child. However, language is insufficient to convey the experience. Only the act of touching the stove and being burned will adequately define the words “hot” and “burn” in the context of “stove.” Essentially, there is no real direct translation of the experience of being burned.

Similarly, there is no word which is the exact equivalent of the experience of sticking one’s finger into an electrical socket. When we stick our hand into the socket, only then do we have a context for the word “shock.” But shock is really a definition of the result of the action of sticking our hand into the socket.

It is the same with mantras. The only true definition is the experience which it ultimately creates in the sayer. Over thousands of years, many sayers have had common experiences and passed them on to the next generation. Through this tradition, a context of experiential definition has been created.

Definitions of mantras are oriented toward either the results of repeating the mantra or of the intentions of the original framers and testers of the mantra.

In Sanskrit, sounds which have no direct translation but which contain great power which can be “Grown” from it are called “Seed Mantras.” Seed in Sanskrit is called “Bijam” in the singular and “Bija” in the plural form.

Let’s take an example. The mantra “Shrim” or Shreem is the seed sound for the principle of abundance (Lakshmi, in the Hindu Pantheon.) If one says “shrim” a hundred times, a certain increase in the potentiality of the sayer to accumulate abundance is achieved. If one says “shrim” a thousand times or a million, the result is correspondingly greater.

But abundance can take many forms. There is prosperity, to be sure, but there is also peace as abundance, health as wealth, friends as wealth, enough food to eat as wealth, and a host of other kinds and types of abundance which may vary from individual to individual and culture to culture. It is at this point that the intention of the sayer begins to influence the degree of the kind of capacity for accumulating wealth which may accrue.

Mantras have been tested and/or verified by their original framers or users.

Each mantra is associated with an actual sage or historical person who once lived. Although the oral tradition predates written speech by centuries, those earliest oral records annotated on palm leaves discussed earlier clearly designate a specific sage as the “seer” of the mantra. This means that the mantra was probably arrived at through some form of meditation or intuition and subsequently tested by the person who first encountered it.

Sanskrit mantras are composed of letters which correspond to certain petals or spokes of chakras in the subtle body.

As discussed earlier, there is a direct relationship between the mantra sound, either vocalized or subvocalized, and the chakras located throughout the body.

Mantras are energy which can be likened to fire.

You can use fire either to cook your lunch or to burn down the forest. It is the same fire. Similarly, mantra can bring a positive and beneficial result, or it can produce an energy meltdown when misused or practiced without some guidance. There are certain mantra formulas which are so exact, so specific and so powerful that they must be learned and practiced under careful supervision by a qualified guru.

Fortunately, most of the mantras widely used in our portal and certainly those contained in this chapter are perfectly safe to use on a daily basis, even with some intensity.

Mantra energizes prana.

“Prana” is a Sanskrit term for a form of life energy which can be transferred from individual to individual. Prana may or may not produce an instant dramatic effect upon transfer. There can be heat or coolness as a result of the transfer.

Some healers operate through transfer of prana. A massage therapist can transfer prana with beneficial effect. Even self-healing can be accomplished by concentrating prana in certain organs, the result of which can be a clearing of the difficulty or condition. For instance, by saying a certain mantra while visualizing an internal organ bathed in light, the specific power of the mantra can become concentrated there with great beneficial effect.

Mantras eventually quiet the mind.

At a deep level, subconscious mind is a collective consciousness of all the forms of primitive consciousnesses which exist throughout the physical and subtle bodies. The dedicated use of mantra can dig into subconscious crystallized thoughts stored in the organs and glands and transform these bodily parts into repositories of peace.

Some of you may be interested or even fascinated by the discipline of mantra, but feel somewhat overwhelmed by the array of mantras and disciplines, astotaras and pujas you find in here. If so, then this chapter will be of use to you. It contains some simple mantras and their common application. They have been compiled from vedas and upanishads, drawn from the various headings of the deities or principles involved. These mantras address various life issues which we all face from time to time.

If you want more information or more mantras relating to the deities or principles involved, email to Katha@ymail.com.

Source: http://mailerindia.com
Visit www.eTirth.com for more religious information.
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Live for Others

Posted by kathavarta on November 15, 2008

Ask nothing, want nothing in return. Give what you have to give, it will come back to you – but do not think of that now. It will come back multiplied – a thousandfold – but the attention must not be on that. You have the power to give. Give, and there it ends.

There is no higher virtue than charity. The lowest man is he whose hand draws in receiving, and he is the highest man whose hand goes out in giving. The hand was made to give always. Give the last bit of bread you have, even if you are starving. You will be perfect, you will become God.

This life is short, the vanities of the world are transient, but they alone live who live for others, the rest are more dead than alive.

Do not stand on a high pedestal and take five cents in your hand and say, ” Here, my poor man,” but be grateful that the poor man is there so that by making a gift to him, you are able to help yourself. It is not the receiver that is blessed, but it is the giver.

We have to bear in mind that we are all debtors to the world and the world does not owe us anything. It is a great privilege for all of us to be allowed to do anything for the world. In helping the world we really help ourselves.

In the world take always the position of the giver. Give everything and look for no return. Give love, give help, give service, give any little thing you can, but keep out barter. Make no conditions and none will be imposed. Let us give out of our own bounty, just as God gives to us.

Posted by Vikas Goyal for topmoralstories.blogspot.com
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