KathaVarta.com: for Short and Moral stories

Posts Tagged ‘Counsel’

Enjoy this conversation

Posted by kathavarta on November 28, 2008

A Project Manager working in a MNC (Indian Govt. office), as usual after lunch goes to the cafeteria for coffee.

He relaxes in canteen. He sees a canteen boy cleaning tables there. so he decides to have fun with him. He calls him.

Project Manager – (Asks canteen boy): How much do you earn?

Canteen boy smiles…

Project Manager: what are your future plans?

Canteen boy keeps quiet…

Project Manager: where do you see yourself 10 years down the line?

Canteen boy gives a cold stare.

Project Manager: Jab mai Bangalore aaya tha tab mere paas bhi kuch nahi tha…. Aaj mere paas kya nahin hai… naam hai, shohrat hai, paisa hai…. tumhare paas kya hai?

Scroll down to find out his answer
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Don’t think that he answered like Shashi Kapoor of Deewar ki “Mere paas Maa hain”
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Scroll some more
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Canteen boy: Sa’ab mere paas kaam hai….

Project Manager leaves the cafeteria silently…….

By: Jagadeesh, for http://www.19.5degs.com
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Posted in Funny Story, Moral story, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Doubts on Guru and Guru’s Grace

Posted by kathavarta on November 10, 2008

Spiritual realization cannot come to you as a miracle done by your Guru. Buddha, Jesus, Moses, Mohammed, Rama Tirtha have all done sadhana -spiritual practices. Krishna asks Arjuna to develop vairagya -dispassion- and abhyasa -practice. He did not say to him, “I will give you mukti -liberation- now.” Therefore, abandon the wrong notion that your Guru will give you instant liberation. You have to strive, perform positive deeds, pray, meditate and realize. The seeker should not sit idle. He must work hard in order to attain liberation. The more you practice, the more benefit for your soul. Nowadays, many people want a magic pill to push them into full realization. If you have got such delusion, give it up immediately.

God, Almighty, guides you through a fully realized Guru. This spiritual master can show you the path. He/She can help removing your doubts and he/she is able to purify your soul. You must always act up to his/her instructions with faith, devotion and a total surrender. The Guru transmits his/her spiritual Light to the seeker purifying, transforming and spiritualizing him. No doubt, the Guru’s blessings or Guru’s grace is very important in your spiritual evolution, but you must keep in mind that you must deserve this blessings or grace by performing positive karma -righteous thoughts, words and actions-, and then alone his/her grace and blessings can do everything.

The Guru’s grace descends upon those who feel faithful to him. Real faith is a total confidence and trust in the Guru. Faith is firm conviction of the truth of what is declared by the preceptor, by way either of testimony or authority, without any other evidence or proof. The student can imbibe or draw Light and knowledge from his/her teacher, in proportion to his/her degree of faith, devotion and surrender.

The Guru tests the students in various ways. Some students misunderstand him/her and lose their faith in him/her. Hence they are not benefited. The Guru always knows what is the best for your soul. Christ stated: “judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment.” (John 7:24). By not possessing full spiritual knowledge, we will not be able to completely understand the actions of a fully realized soul. That is why you should never judge such a great soul. Always remember that it is impossible to fully understand the nature of the actions of a fully realized soul, so never judge him/her, or you will end up immersed into chaos and confusion. Measure not his/her divine nature with the inadequate yardstick of your ignorance. Criticize not your Guru’s action which is always done on universal vision. His/Her knowledge and experience is so vast that we will not be able to fully understand him/her. He/She only knows what is good for your soul and that he/she will give you. Maybe you will not like it but you must always remember that what he/she gives or instructs you, is the best for your spiritual growth.

Due to your ever-changing mind sometimes doubts emerge towards your Guru: “is He/She really helping me,” “I do not feel any change within my soul,” “is heshe really a manifestation of God,” “am I imagining things about his/her divine nature,” “why does he/she answer me in such a way,” “he/she does not smile at me as frequently as he/she does to others,” “he/she does not give me what I want from him/her,” “why should I surrender to a Guru, it is an absurdity,” “I have the capacity to evolve by myself,” “I do not need anyone to attain spiritual liberation,” etc.

All these ideas should be annihilated immediately because there is a great danger that I can perceive in darshans -spiritual visions. When you lose faith in your Guru, or there is a doubt or rebelliousness towards him/her, then automatically the spiritual connection that you have with your spiritual master diminishes, and you tend to move away from that precious Light that strengthens and purifies your soul, losing a precious opportunity to evolve at a higher pace, then you may undoubtedly go astray without the protection of that divine Light. This process is automatic, so be very careful on this matter. Whenever wrong ideas about your Guru rise in your mind, you must immediately pray to your Guru or to the Almighty in order to extinguish these wrongful thoughts.

Because of their ego, some become self-sufficient, arrogant, and self-assertive in these days. They do not care to carry the spiritual instructions of a Guru. They think they are in a state of super consciousness when they do not know even the A-B-C of spirituality. This is the reason why they do not grow. This is a very common mistake nowadays. Ego is the archenemy on the path of spiritual evolution.

As stated before, sage Agasthiar, one of the Eighteen Tamil Yoga Siddhas, declared that he had depended on his own self and vanity, and this had deprived him of the attainment of wisdom.

Source: www.santhigiri.com.
Visit www.eTirth.com for Gurus information
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Posted in Hindu story, Katha, Moral story, Religious, Sikhism, Story for Adult | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Guru-Disciple Relationship in Different Philosophies

Posted by kathavarta on November 9, 2008

The knowledge of the Self or mukti -spiritual liberation- is the subject of discussion in the Upanishads -sacred texts of Hindu thought, which form the concluding portion of the Vedas, sacred texts of India. In the Upanishads, the Truth is revealed by the teacher -Guru- to the student -sishya- through the method of inquiry, in which the student is led on to subtler levels of knowledge.

The Truth of the Self cannot come through one who has not realized that he is the Self. The intellect cannot reveal the Self, beyond its duality of subject and object. They who see themselves in all and all in them, help others through ‘spiritual osmosis’ to realize the Selfthemselves. This awakening you have known comes not through logic and scholarship, but fromclose association with a realized teacher -Guru. (Katha Upanishad -sacred book of Hinduism. Part 1, 2:9, p. 85).

Subtle philosophical concepts are interwoven in the different anecdotes related in the Puranas -Indian works of an historical and prophetic character- and the epics, which are usually in the form of a dialogue between a sage and another person who learns under him. This highlights the importance of Guru-Shishya (master-disciple) tradition for gaining spiritual knowledge.

In the Dhammapada -sacred Buddhist text- it is stated that when a man venerates those worthy of veneration, be they Buddhas or their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond sorrow and tears, venerating such as these, whose passions are extinguished and for whom there is no further source for fear, no one can calculate how great his merit is. Obviously this is the description of a fully realized soul -a Guru.

In the Hua Hu Ching, book written by Lao Tzu -Chinese philosopher who is traditionally regarded as the founder of Taoism- the author declares, “Find a teacher who is an integral being, a beacon who extends his Light and virtue with equal ease to those who appreciate him and those who don’t. Shape yourself in his mold, bathe in his nourishing radiance, and reflect it out to the rest of the Universe.”

In the Tibetan Book of Living and Dying it is stated that there is only one way of attaining liberation and of obtaining the omniscience of enlightenment: following an authentic spiritual master.

In the Chandogya Upanishad -sacred book of Hinduism– itself it is declared that only by the grace of the Guru, true knowledge is possible. It says “aacaaryavaan purusho veda” -only one who has a preceptor, gains true knowledge.

The sacred bond which exists between the Guru and the disciple, is unique to the Vedic tradition, wherein knowledge is passed on from one generation to the next, through the Guru-Sishya (master-disciple) tradition. The ultimate knowledge of God Almighty can only be grasped by the grace of the Guru, who removes the ignorance from the mind of the disciple, by kindling the spark of wisdom in him. The importance of the Guru is shown to us, by no less a person than Sri Krishna himself, who says he can never recompense his gratitude to his Guru, sage Sandipani .

In the Bhagavad-gita -sacred Hindu text- (18.66) Krishna instructs:

“sarva-dharman parityajya
mam ekam saranam vraja
aham tvam sarva-papebhyo
moksayis yami ma sucah”

“Abandon all varieties of religion and just surrender unto Me. I shall deliver you from all sinful reaction. Do not fear.”

Also in the Gita it is stated that “Some realize the Self within them through the practice of meditation, some by the path of wisdom, and others by selfless service. Others may not know these paths; but hearing and following the instructions of an illumined teacher, they too go beyond death.”

In the Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna (p. 253), Ramakrishna -great Indian sage- declares that “If a man in the form of a Guru awakens spiritual consciousness in you, then know for certain that it is God the Absolute who has assumed that human form for your sake. The Guru is like a companion who leads you by the hand.”

In page 488 of the same book, Ramakrishna expresses, “The roof is clearly visible, but extremely hard to reach. But if someone who has already reached it, drops down a rope, he can pull another person up.”

Bodhidharma, famous Indian Buddhist monk, founder of the Zen school of Buddhism, declared: “If you don’t find a teacher soon, you’ll live this life in vain. It’s true, you have the Buddha-nature. But without the help of a teacher you’ll never know it. Only one person in a million becomes enlightened without a teacher’s help.”

It is very clearly summarized by Sri Shankaracharya -great Indian philosopher who developed Advaita Vedanta, monism- in his book Viveka Chudamani, verse 3: “There are three things that are rare indeed and are due to the grace of God: the human birth, the intense desire for liberation, and the protecting care of a perfected sage -a Guru.” Sri Shankaracharya also points out that the one who having that yearning does not strive hard to achieve his liberation “is really committing suicide.”

In his discourse on the Upadesa Undiyar of Ramana Maharshi, famous Indian sage, Sri Muralidhara Swami said, the sage had clearly stated in this work that performance of karma -actions- by itself could not liberate man. Even if karma is performed without the expectation of results -nishkama karma- this will not completely bless one with Self-knowledge. It is here that the Guru plays an important role in the spiritual progress of an individual. Though man is subject to karma and cannot overcome it through his own efforts, he must understand that there is a greater power, a Guru who is Self-realized and is verily God Himself, will certainly illuminate the disciple when he makes himself eligible for Guru’s grace.

The great Indian sage Ramakrishna Paramahamsa stated that a real Guru was of a great importance in one’s spiritual evolution.

The spiritual significance of the word Guru is very vast. To quote Kabir, famous Indian mystic and poet, who was born Muslim and a man of great occult powers and who came under the tutelage of his chosen Guru, a Hindu. “Even if all the trees in the Universe are made into pens and the whole of the sea water converted into ink still it will be insufficient to illustrate fully the glory of the Guru.”

The sage Agasthiar -One of the Eighteen Tamil Yoga Siddhas has sung:

“Sasthirathin melirukkum
Sathguruve pottamal
Ahatthinude Anavatthal
Arivizhanthen pooraname!”

“The Satguru -realized spiritual master- is the perfect one who is above the descriptions and denominations, contained in the scriptures without paying my dutiful homage to that embodiment of perfection, I had depended on my own-self and vanity. This has deprived me of the attainment of wisdom.”

Sri Narayana Guru -famous spiritual master of South India– stated:

“Arivilumeri arinjidunnavanthan
Uruvilumothu purathumujjwalikkum
Karuvinu kannukalanchum ulladakki
Theruthere veenu vanagi othidenam”

“The disciple should prostrate himself before the Guru who is the embodiment of pure wisdom. For this, the disciple should bring his five senses fully under control. The Guru’s inner Light of wisdom is also displayed externally.”

I have quoted a few words of great souls who had arrived at correct conclusions, based on spiritual experience.

Source: www.santhigiri.com
Visit www.eTirth.com for Gurus information.
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Posted in Children story, Hindu story, Katha, Moral story, Religious, Sikhism, Story for Adult | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Farmer and the Stork

Posted by kathavarta on October 27, 2008

A Farmer placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed.

With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life.

“Pray save me, Master,” he said, “and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers–they are not the least like those of a Crane.”

The Farmer laughed aloud and said, “It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company.”

Moral:
Birds of a feather flock together.
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The Farmer and the Cranes

Posted by kathavarta on October 25, 2008

Some Cranes made their feeding grounds on some plowlands newly sown with wheat.

For a long time the Farmer, brandishing an empty sling, chased them away by the terror he inspired; but when the birds found that the sling was only swung in the air, they ceased to take any notice of it and would not move.

The Farmer, on seeing this, charged his sling with stones, and killed a great
number.

The remaining birds at once forsook his fields, crying to each other, “It is time for us to be off to Liliput: for this man is no longer content to scare us, but begins to show us in earnest what he can do.”

Moral:
If words suffice not, blows must follow.
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The Farmer and his Sons

Posted by kathavarta on October 25, 2008

A Father, being on the point of death, wished to be sure that his sons would give the same attention to his farm as he himself had given it.

He called them to his bedside and said, “My sons, there is a great treasure hid in one of my vineyards.”

The sons, after his death, took their spades and mattocks and carefully dug over every portion of their land.

They found no treasure, but the vines repaid their labour by an extraordinary and
superabundant crop.

Moral:
Industry sometimes pays unexpected dividends.
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