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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 6

Posted by kathavarta on June 7, 2011

Japa mantra meditation, is a simple and effective technique that can be used both as a meditation practice, and in daily life. It focuses on calms the mind, while also creating a subtle vibrations a spiritual nature.

Japa is the Sanskrit name given to the repetition of a mantra. The use of mantra is a spiritual practice is not limited to the traditions of the East. Catholic and Orthodox Christianity for example both utilize the repetition of mantra.

As meditation practice, Japa is usually done with the use of a mala. A mala is a necklace of beads used for counting the mantra as it is spoken or thought. Commonly a mala has 108 beads and a larger head bead, sometimes called the Guru bead. Upon reaching this bead, the mala is turned in the hand and the count begins back again, the head bead isn’t passed.

This use of a mala, gives another dimension to the focus and attention of the mind while the mantra is being repeated. This focusing on the attention is one of the objectives of the practice. The mind likes to have something to do, the mantra meditation gives it something to do. The discipline and attention is to keep the mind focused on only that one thing.

Some people say that the word or words you use as the mantra are not important, as long as they have some positive meaning for you. The science of mantra, is one that is largely lost in a real and living way. However the power and importance of the vibration of words and their effect upon us, is becoming understood again through the work of Masuro Emoto. Basically each word has a unique vibration and that vibration has an effect. Therefore the word or words used will resonate their vibration within the user as they are spoken or thought.

The most powerful mantra is one given to us by a fully realized, or perfect Master. This can be a form of initiation with the Master, as they whisper the mantra in your ear, they imbue it with their consciousness. The mantra then is a means of connecting with the consciousness of the Master and regardless of the actual mantra can be a means of devotion.

The quality that the repetition is done with also has a significant effect. The mantra can be repeated mechanically which may focus the mind and have a certain benefit. When the mantra it is repeated with feeling the effect is greatly heightened. This effect reaches its pinnacle when the mantra is repeated the feeling of love.

Reaching this quality of love in the practice of japa its probably easiest when the mantra is of a particular deity or god. For example Om Namah Shivayah. For such mantras, the repetition becomes a communion with the beloved and invites the consciousness of the chosen aspect of the divine into the devotee. Like any form of spiritual practice there is the development of a deeply intimate and personal relationship. It is true the development of this intimacy with that any mantra will eventually reach feelings of love.

Ideally the repetition of mantra ultimately leads to silence. In practice, this may come from a period of chanting the mantra aloud, followed by repetition is a barely audible whisper, leading into silent repetition, ultimately leading into silence. If silence does not arise it is not an indication that something is being done wrong, it is not something that can be created or forced artificially. As with all spiritual practice patience, discipline and dedication lead to the subtler rewards.
With time as we begin to experience these subtler levels of mantra meditation we will find that willpower is no longer necessary to remember and repeat the mantra. Instead, the mantra rises and repeats itself and the practice is more one of paying attention to this process. When this happens the speed and feeling also become spontaneous. We will probably also naturally drop counting as the mantra repeats.

By this time a mala, as well as all the other aspects that we formulated as part of the ritual practicing Japa may seem unnecessary. They do however still have roles. Over time they have become the familiar conditions associated with entering meditation. So while it may no longer be necessary to counter is the mantra is repeated, it may be the simple act of picking up the mile that initiates connection with this deeper inner state.

We may also find that by now a part of our mind is constantly repeating the mantra, and are we are not aware of it all the time. Certain simple repetitious actions, walking for example, will connect us with this on-going repetition of the mantra in our minds. This is obviously made easier when in the past we have made these connections consciously. The action of chewing while eating is another good place to establish this connection.

Another aspect of this shift to subtler dimensions of mantra meditation is that instead of repeating the mantra we feel as if we are listening to it. It is from this place of listening that the mantra will lead us into silence.

Ray Baskerville is a healer, meditation teacher, certified hypnotherapist, yogi and proud father. He has worked as a healer, taught meditation and yoga worldwide. Ray is also the creator and editor of lifedivine.net an online magazine for yoga, meditation, spirituality and personal development.

Please visit for more free quality articles like this.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ray_Baskerville

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2266211

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May Lord Hari bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 5

Posted by kathavarta on June 6, 2011

The Hare Krishna devotees follow a method of meditation called japa meditation where the practitioner chants the below Hare Krishna maha-mantra on beads.:

Hare Krishna Hare Krishna Krishna Krishna Hare Hare
Hare Rama Hare Rama Rama Rama Hare Hare

The japa mala consists of 108 beads strung together, with one larger bead, known as Krishna bead, in the centre. The beads are either carved from Neem or Tulasi wood. Anyone can engage in this meditation using Neem beeds but Tulasi beads are reserved for those who are also following the other processes of bhakti. The beads should be kept very respectfully that is why the Hare Krishna devotees keep their beads in specially made bead bags.

The best time for japa meditation is early morning before the sun rises. This time, brahma-muhurta is tranquil and conducive for spiritual practices. Preferably one should sit upright to chant, but he may also walk. Chanting near a Tulasi plant increases the spiritual potency of the meditation. One may also chant with a recording of Srila Prabhupada chanting japa, playing softly alongside. You may listen to and download a file of Srila Prabhupada chanting one round of japa here.

Lord Krishna demands full surrender from His devotee but Lord Chaitanya is so merciful that he does not see anyone’s faults or limitations. Before chanting each round of japa take shelter of Lord Chaitanya by chanting the pancha-tattva mantra and pray that that the Lord forgives any offences committed while chanting.

The panca-tattva-mantra: jaya sri krishna chaitanya, prabhu nityananda, sri advaita, gadadhara, shrivasadi gaura bhakta vrinda

Start chanting on the first bead after the Krishna bead. Holding the bead between the middle finger and thumb of your right hand, chant each mantra on each bead. Chant softly but audibly and distinctly. The essence of japa meditation is concentration on the sound vibration. When you have chanted 108 mantras you will reach the Krishna bead. You have chanted one round! Do not cross the Krishna bead but after chanting the pancha-tattva-mantra, reverse the beads and chant in the opposite direction to which you started.

In the beginning it may take 10 minutes or more to complete one round but as you gain practice the speed will increase. But don’t forget to pay attention to correct pronunciation and concentration.

You may chant as many rounds as you feel like. Initiated devotees chant a minimum of 16 rounds daily. But what is important is that your chant the same number of rounds every day, and try to increase that number.

The mood of the practitioner is very important. One should chant in a prayerful mood, and with all humility beg the holy names to cleanse one’s heart so that one’s spiritual realizations can increase and the full potency of japa meditation can be experienced.

Source: http://www.iskconmauritius.com

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May God bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 4

Posted by kathavarta on June 5, 2011

Reciting mantras or prayers is today’s topic. Now I don’t care about your religion or sect or whatever prayer or mantra you use, but if you want quick and sure spiritual progress from reciting prayers or mantras (“japa meditation” in India) as your form of meditation or spiritual practice, then here’s the principles to follow.

Follow them and you make progress. Don’t follow them and you only gain a bit of merit, and that’s about all.

First, you can recite mantras or prayers out loud in a rhythmical fashion, and that will tend to get your chi (vital energy) moving in a balanced fashion in your body. The same thing happens for Christian monks who sing Latins everyday at 4:00 in the morning; when they stop doing it, they no longer set up that rhythmical chi flow and tend to get depressed. In a sense, they are cultivating the chi of their body through their singing, but because they don’t know the higher principles of practice, never turn the singing into the spiritual progress achieved by meditation.

All because they don’t know the principles of practice…they only know they should sing.

The best way to recite mantras (japa practice) is internally. You recite a mantra within your mind and listen to it within. In fact, here’s the key: you recite the mantra or prayer CONSTANTLY and listen to it with one-pointed concentration (not trying to figure out the meaning, but listening to the sound), until all your thoughts die down and your mind quiets.

When THAT happens, you have succeeded.

Remember to listen to the mantra with MINDFULNESS, but not trying to fathom the meaning.

You can use any type of virtuous and time-tested mantra to do this…the website has several. Don’t use sounds like “Coca cola, coca cola” because they will plant the seeds of subtle psychological problems. Don’t make up your own sound either if time-tested ones are available. That would be stupid now, wouldn’t it?

“Ohm mani bei me hon,” “Namo Amitofo,” and so on will do just fine. They’re tested, they work. So will the Jesus prayer, “Hallelujah” or the Islamic prayer to Allah: “Laa ilaaha illallaah.” Most of these mantras, by the way, are based on the “Ah” sound, aren’t they? “Jehovah” is, too. Notice the Islamic mantra “Laa ilaaha illallaah,” and you’ll quickly realize why reciting it over and over again, according to the proper principles of cultivation practice, has led many dervishes and Sufis to samadhi attainments.

Now as I stated, it doesn’t matter what you use as long as it’s virtuous, it’s tested, your intent is virtuous and you follow the principles to calm your mind. On the other hand, if you just recite a prayer or mantra without listening within and don’t calm your mind, then all you can hope to have done is attain a little bit of merit from the practice and that’s about all. You don’t succeed in meditation that way. You put in all this time and you get nothing out of it when if you follow the correct principles of practice, you put in the same amount of time and get the REAL result.

Choose the outcome you want, okay?

If you want REAL spiritual progress, you must recite a holy sound (discovered by spiritual masters in the past) until you reach inner mental calming, and at that point, you try to forget yourself, the sound and everything and enter into samadhi. That’s what cultivation is all about, whether you use this meditation practice, that one, or yet another.

That’s mantra practice in a nutshell.

Remember, if you choose to recite a prayer or mantra, do it continuously all day long until it becomes a type of internal habit. Don’t do this with untested sounds or prayers, but with the ones that various traditions have found work.

Source: meditationexpert.com

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May God bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 3

Posted by kathavarta on June 4, 2011

Among the many types of meditation, the mantra method used in Japa meditation is one of the easiest and most widely used meditations to calm and empty the mind.

So how does the Law of Attraction relate to Japa Meditation? The Law of Attraction says that if you change your thoughts, you can change your life. By changing your thoughts, you change your vibration and therefore the things that you attract.

It is said that the average person has 60,000 thoughts per day and most of us have no real control over them. Meditation is a way to begin to take control of your mind and your thoughts.

Japa Meditation is used all over the world by a many people to reduce stress, create a sense of calmness and bring great benefits to our health and happiness. The practice of meditation involves clearing the mind of all external stimuli and random thoughts in order to focus on one singular image or thought.

The repetition of a mantra or the name of God is called “Japa” and it is regarded as one of the most effective methods of meditation. You can use any word as long as you find it “uplifting”. Many people meditate to the sound of “AH” which is the sound of creation. Another popular mantra is “OM” which is the sound of the universe.

Japa meditation is an important part of yoga. Modern science can confirm what yogis have known for thousands of years which is that sound, is able to change the chemistry of the body and mind and alter thought patterns. The vibrations of these mantras are extremely effective in creating changes in your thoughts and mental well-being.

Mantras may be said silently to yourself, with your own inner voice (Manasika Japa), whispered (Upamshu Japa) or out loud (Vaikhar Japa). Saying mantras out loud is similar to the technique of chanting. For beginners, it is recommended that you say the mantra out loud because it helps you to focus your mind and tune out to all other distractions.

It is often recommended that you meditate for up to 20 minutes at a time. 108 times is supposed to be a powerful number of times to chant your mantra. But don’t be put off meditating just because you don’t have the time. We can benefit immensely from just 5 minutes of meditation or even 2 minutes.

Meditation is not so much a religious experience (though it can be) as a spiritual experience. During meditation we are trying to connect to our inner self. The inner self is your eternal being that is beyond your physical body, mind or intellect.

Maria Westcott
Founder
The Mind’s Eye Productions
On the-secrets-of-the-law-of-attraction.com

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May God bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 2

Posted by kathavarta on June 3, 2011

Everyone has heard of chanting but most people don’t know what it’s all really about. Japa meditation is a form of relaxation where the deliberation is to focus completely on one word being repeated for a period of time. Everyone has heard of chanting but most people don’t know what it’s all really about. There are different schools of thought as to what the best words should be to use in your Japa meditation, but as long as it has a positive impact on you individually, that is the most important consideration.

Japa meditation is widely practiced by Buddhists and Hindu’s, but many other Dharmic religions also use it as a form of relaxation and to reach a trance-like state. A well-known Japa meditation word is “Aum”, and is pronounced “Ah-oo-mm”. When you repeat this word slowly again and again it actually causes a vibration through your entire head and is believed to be stimulating and relaxing for the brain. The word Aum is used to describe the universal energy of God and creator of life, and many people choose to use their own word for God or figure of worship in their own Japa meditations. The word you repeat is also referred to as a mantra.

Japa meditation is fantastic for groups to do, and whether you choose to whisper the word or say it more loudly, it all just blends in with everyone else. Some believe that group Japa meditations allow for deeper relaxation and spiritual refection as the energy of the group amplifies the energy and deepens rumination. It can be more difficult to find the time and space for your personal Japa meditation sessions, and you probably don’t want the neighbours to hear the whole thing! A good idea could be to buy a CD or tape you can do your mantra too so it isn’t so obvious and you won’t feel as conspicuous.

If you are interested in learning to meditate you should definitely give consideration to Japa meditation techniques. You can achieve deep, blissful relaxation and will be surprised by how thoroughly enjoyable and satisfying an experience it will be. Some people like to do light Japa meditation while driving; simply repeating their chosen mantra to maintain relaxation and detachment from every day driving annoyances, or you can even do it in your lunch breaks.

You have probably seen people from Dharmic religions wearing wooden beads around there neck or wrist. These are mala beads, and are used for their Japa meditation. Traditionally, the string consists of 108 small beads and one larger meru bead to mark the beginning or end. When doing a Japa meditation, they use the beads like a counter and twist them between their thumb and third finger, one time for each mantra repetition. The beads assist in maintaining focus, and when they feel the large bead they begin back along the string in reverse without touching the meru. Interestingly enough this is not unlike the Hail Mary’s performed by those of the catholic religion.

Some Buddhist monks prefer to use words that have no meaning but are mantra sounds. The reasoning behind this is that you can more easily clear your mind and reach a trance-like state if you aren’t aware of or taking into consideration the meaning you attach to the word. They also incorporate Japa meditation techniques into other practices such as walking meditations and active meditations.

If you already have a great appreciation of meditation, you should definitely give Japa meditation a try. It is an experience unique to each individual who practices it, and every chosen mantra should be personal, precious and positive. Japa meditation is a fantastic way to achieve a deep state of relaxation and oneness in a short amount of time, and once you get there you won’t want to return for quite some time, so enjoyable is the experience. As with all rumination practices, you will come away feeling refreshed, rejuvenated and reconnected with your life force and passions.

Source: By Karen Basfield on http://www.project-meditation.org

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May God bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

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Importance and Meaning of Japa Series: 1

Posted by kathavarta on June 2, 2011

Mantras are words or prayers that are composed of psychically potent sound syllables that influence the human system. Repeating mantras with or without a counting device is known as Japa or mantra yoga. Japa is a practice used by aspirants of all religions – Jews, Christians, Hindus, Muslims, Zoroastrians,… – as a powerful tool to control the mind. They all believe that an idle mind is the devil’s workshop, and they work on themselves by doing prayers, often with a rosary.

In Tantric Japa one repeats mantras for a prescribed number of times. After nine tenth of the total number of repetitions have been done or after completion of the prescribed number, offerings of ghee and herbs are made to the fire. When it is done without any desire, it needs no such fire worship or Homa.

Silent Japa (upanshu Japa) is supposed to be more powerful than when said aloud. An easy way to exercise silent Japa is to perform it aloud for a period of time so that the ears will hear the mantras and the brain will register it. The aspirant should keep on decreasing the volume of the sound, using bass sounds, and should gradually start doing the mantra yoga silently. This Japa method is effective because the cerebral cortex will keep on repeating the mantras for a period of time even after the audible Japa has stopped. The speed of Japa should remain uniform, and it should be done in sustained tones.

Written Japa is a powerful variation of silent Japa. It entails writing the name of the deity on paper, birch bark or tree leaves. Written Japa creates a habit of silent Japa and is supposed to be ten times more powerful. Written Japa can be made even more powerful if a picture of the deity is composed by the writing. Also, the use of different colours can make it more aesthetic and powerful. Below are some more examples of written Japa

The first, last, and best mantra is “AUM”. It is the supreme consciousness in sound form. It is Creator, Preserver, and Destroyer all in one. Using AUM before and after any mantra in Japa harmonizes the two hemispheres of the brain and creates a magical effect.

Source: sanatansociety.org

Japa is my favourite method for meditate, as it takes me straight to my almighty, in a very simple and easy way. I am starting a Japa articles which was published on various good websites. I hope you may like my effort.

Last but very important, I and KathaVarta.com is very very grateful for all those websites who has published the meaning and importance of Japa meditation and I am able to recycle those great articles for this KathaVarta.org. I hope they will forgive me for the copy and Paste those articles for KathaVarta.com.

If you have any objection please do not hesitate to contact me on Katha@ymail.com, I will immediately remove the article from KathaVarta.com

May God bless you.

HariAUM from Saurabh

Kindly visit my another website www.Mandirs.com for Hindu Deities, Mandirs (Temples) and Festival information.

Posted in Buddhism, Jainism, Katha, Moral story, Sikhism | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »